Form Of Teaming Agreement

To become a prime con­trac­tor, a com­pany must first reg­is­ter with the Sys­tem for Award Man­age­ment (SAM). Fed­eral con­trac­tual pos­si­bil­i­ties can be con­sulted via Fed­Bi­zOpps and GSA Sched­ules. You will find out­sourc­ing oppor­tu­ni­ties in the data­base of the sub­con­tract­ing net­work and his­tor­i­cal infor­ma­tion on pub­lic pro­cure­ment avail­able in the fed­eral data­base sys­tems — Next Gen­er­a­tion. Team­ing, how­ever, is another con­cept. FAR Sub­part 9.6 defines a con­trac­tor team con­tract as an agree­ment in which; 1) cre­ate a part­ner­ship or joint ven­ture with two or more com­pa­nies to become a poten­tial prime con­trac­tor, or 2. A poten­tial prime con­trac­tor is agreed with one or more other com­pa­nies to act as sub­con­trac­tors under a spe­cific con­tract or acqui­si­tion pro­gramme. It is essen­tially an agree­ment for the devel­op­ment of a sub­con­tract for the spe­cific acqui­si­tion, once it has been awarded. Pre­mium and sub­con­tract­ing agree­ments in the pub­lic pro­cure­ment sys­tem are prob­a­bly more famil­iar to most peo­ple than team agree­ments. Under the nor­mal prin­ci­pal and sub­con­trac­tor rela­tion­ship, prime con­trac­tors work directly with the government.

You man­age all sub­con­trac­tors and are respon­si­ble for car­ry­ing out the work as defined in the con­tract. Team agree­ments of GSA con­trac­tors offer another team pos­si­bil­ity. There, the Con­trac­tor Team­ing Agree­ment (CTA) allows con­trac­tors to use their GSA sched­ule to develop a solu­tion for the gov­ern­ment and does not cre­ate a sep­a­rate legal entity, but allows sched­ule con­trac­tors to meet buyer require­ments by com­bin­ing sup­plies and ser­vices from the sep­a­rate con­tract sched­ule of each team mem­ber in response to a buyer‘s request for offer. Sub­con­tract­ing oppor­tu­ni­ties are pub­lished in the fol­low­ing direc­to­ries: other dif­fer­ences between GAs and main and sub­con­trac­tor agree­ments are indi­cated below: unlike major con­trac­tors, sub­con­trac­tors do not col­lab­o­rate directly with the gov­ern­ment, but for other con­trac­tors. Some gov­ern­ment con­tracts require large com­pa­nies to sub­con­tract a small busi­ness. This cre­ates more oppor­tu­ni­ties for small busi­nesses to par­tic­i­pate in fed­eral contracts.…